Industrial IoT continues to cause disruption; not just in manufacturing, but across many other industries as well. In the last few months we’ve been keeping a pulse on the state of digital transformation across the business landscape and have been discovering exciting new implementations of Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT). This week we’re highlighting the disruption Industrial IoT is instigating as product development and lifecycle management continues to evolve.

Overcoming Three Key Barriers to Industrial IoT

Industrial IoT has the potential to capture data in real-time, leverage big data analytics and streamline efficiency to name a few. So what’s hold back the industry? A major barrier has to do with culture of the operational technology (OT) organizations within the industry. The OT have a risk-averse way of thinking and see change as disruption, “Whereas IT is defined by constant change and innovation, that’s why it’s not unusual to see industrial automation systems in service for decades at a time with little or no change.”

Bringing Smart Technology to Old Factories Can be an Industrial-Sized Disruption

It sounds amazing to have robotic arms working together with the Industrial IoT. The reality is manufacturing is being disrupted by the implementation of IIoT. Mary Catherine O’Connor with the Wall Street Journal reminds us that, “Often plant managers can’t tell which sensor will most accurately collect the data they want from a machine without a series of test runs—a time-consuming process.”

Product-Development Strategies in the IIoT Disruption

The key to succeeding with IIoT disruption will be to focus on the new innovation of both product and software for the industry. Machine Design reminds us that, “IIoT is a disruptive force that will shape product-development trends over the next decade and beyond.”

Relying on CMM to Keep IIoT’s Disruption Positive

All the talk up to this point has been about the negative disruptive impacts IIoT is having on the industry. IIoT has the ability to drastically change manufacturing with a positive level of disruption introduced on the shop-floor. According the the American Machinist positive disruption can happen, “By using coordinate measuring machinery (CMM), machine shops or other manufacturers are able to capture the precise details of the geometry or surface conditions of a workplace. Working within IIoT, those manufacturers then are able to share such data between machines, exchange information between facilities, or with customers or suppliers.”

Now we would like to leave you with this quick excerpt from Kevin Ashton, a British technology pioneer who co-founded the Auto-ID Center at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and inventor of the term “the Internet of Things.”

How the Internet of Things Disruption Gains Traction – Extreme IoT

We hope you have enjoyed this closer look at the disruption Industrial IoT is bringing to the table and what steps are being done to allow more implementation across the industry. Let’s us know what disruption you have seen with IIoT.

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