Where wires once ruled the day, wireless data solutions are now entrenched into the very fabric of the business.

It will be interesting to see what the future of wireless technology will be able to tackle. This past week, ITU Radio Communication Assembly met to figure out that very thing. The ITU only meets every three to four years, so it is important that they covered the current and expected wireless resolutions. Topping the list was a push for 5G systems expected to become a reality by 2020. 5G will offer extremely high definition video services, real-time low-latency applications and overall expansion of IoT. Yet another key point solved by the ITU meeting is that “RA-15 recognized that the globally connected world of IoT builds on the connectivity and functionality made possible by radio communication networks and that the growing number of IoT applications may require enhanced transmission speed, device connectivity, and energy efficiency to accommodate the significant amounts of data among a plethora of devices.”

As the bright future of wireless grows across the globe, it will continue to evolve and transform the way we use wireless in our daily lives. ISA reported this week that automation is essential for the next-generation of industrial wireless. Businesses need to be switching to high-speed broadband wireless in order to capitalize on the technological applications available to move those industries forward.

This surge to operate wirelessly has created a crowded technological highway, with everyone wanting their message to be heard. DARPA has recognized this noise and developed a RadioMap to detect radio frequency (RF) spectrum congestion. RadioMap is able to transmit this information through the radios already deployed for various reasons. This unique program helps create plans of action by identifying times when the frequency usage is jammed or clear, thus informing them of the best times to communicate.

Now that the wireless traffic has been sorted, let’s consider the possibility of wireless power solutions. According to Oil Price, wireless power is already in use in some commercial spaces, and will continue to gain more support as technology improves. Michael McDonald with Oil Price boldly predicts wireless power could be used to support the massive energy needs of the defense and healthcare industries by 2016.

Unfortunately, not everyone agrees that wireless technology has been a seamless transition. ECN recently asked a handful of industry experts about the challenges they face as they integrate wireless IoT into their business. For example, Vera Jorkitulppo, a senior product manager of GE’s embedded power product line at Critical Power Business, believes, “At the other end of the radio link, there will be a multitude of diverse IoT devices developed by innovative companies with new solutions to real-world consumer or industrial problems.”

Now, the next-generation of wireless technology may have its challenges, but, overall, the future looks bright, so put on some shades and enjoy this evolution.

Hope you enjoy this week’s reading. As always, tell us what we missed!

The Future of Wireless Communication (MyBroadband)

Last week, the ITU Radio Communication Assembly met to set the future direction of wireless communication.  At this year’s assembly, Hans Groenendaal from mybroadband reported back that they had “reached significant decisions that will influence the future development of radio communications worldwide in an increasingly wireless environment.”

Industrial Wireless Evolution (ISA)

Establishing the next generation of industrial wireless classification, system requirements, I/O and network capabilities for the industry.  Soliman Al-Walaie writes, “Wireless technology is an essential business enabler for the automation world.”

What Wireless Networking Challenges Do You Foresee with the Onset of IoT? (ECN Mag)

Jamie Wisniewski asked an assortment of experts what they see as possible wireless network problems with the integration of IoT. Greg Fyke, a marketing director of IoT wireless products at Silicon Labs, suggests that “There are three key wireless networking challenges for successful Industrial Internet of Things (IIoT) implementation, including reliable communication, security and control.”

Darpa’s RadioMap Detects RF Spectrum Congestion (GCN)

An interconnected connected wireless world has created congested airways, thus making the management of military communication and intelligence gathering radio frequencies of critical importance. “RadioMap adds value to existing radios, jammers and other RF electronic equipment used by our military forces in the field,” said John Chapin, DARPA program manager.

Will 2016 Be the Year of Wireless Energy? (Oil Price)

Oil Price looks at the possibility of wireless energy being able to support defense, healthcare and other massive energy needs in the near future, maybe even by 2016. Michael McDonald’s research shows that, “Wireless power has been a dream of mankind’s for decades, but the technology finally appears to be gaining some traction.”

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